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February 2020 Health Newsletter

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» Broccoli - The Cancer Fighter
» "Mind-body" Therapy Shows Promise For Fibromyalgia
» Chiropractors on Capitol Hill Push for Improved Coverage for Medicare Beneficiaries
» Electric Bikes and Scooters Associated with Severe Injuries
» Most Sustained Weight Loss Lowers Womenís Breast Cancer Risk

Broccoli - The Cancer Fighter

What if a few servings of broccoli a week could help prevent, even fight off prostate cancer? New research indicates there may just be truth to this. A team of British researchers from the Institute of Food Research found dietary broccoli consumption of 400 grams per week activated genes that control inflammation and cancer formation in the prostate. According to researchers, when people get cancer some genes are switched off and some are switched on, and, what broccoli seems to be doing is switching on genes which prevent cancer development and switching off other genes that help it to spread. Thus, dietary broccoli consumption was able to affect the expression of cancer formation/inflammation/spreading genes in a positive manner. Prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death in men with approximately 680,000 men diagnosed worldwide.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: PLoS One. July 2, 2008.


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"Mind-body" Therapy Shows Promise For Fibromyalgia

A form of 'mind-body' therapy that focuses on the role of emotions in physical pain may offer some relief to people with fibromyalgia, a small clinical trial suggests.

The study, of 45 women with fibromyalgia, found that those who learned a technique called "affective self-awareness" were more likely to show a significant reduction in their pain over six months. Overall, 46 percent of the women had a 30-percent or greater reduction in their pain severity, as measured by a standard pain-rating scale.

Fibromyalgia is a syndrome marked by widespread pain -- including discomfort at specific "tender points" in the body -- along with symptoms such as fatigue, irritable bowel and sleep problems. It is estimated to affect up to 5 million U.S. adults, most commonly middle-aged women.

The precise cause of fibromyalgia is unknown -- there are no physical signs, such as inflammation and tissue damage in the painful area -- but some researchers believe the disorder involves problems in how the brain processes pain signals.

Standard treatments include painkillers, antidepressants, cognitive- behavioral therapy and exercise therapy. However, many people with fibromyalgia find that their symptoms -- pain, in particular -- persist despite treatment.

Part of that, according to the researchers on the new study, may be because standard treatments do not specifically address the role psychological stress and emotions can play in triggering people's pain.

That is not to say that the pain people with fibromyalgia feel is "all in their head," stressed Dr. Howard Schubiner, of St. John Health/ Providence Hospital and Medical Centers in Southfield, Michigan.

"The pain is very real," Schubiner said in an interview. But, he explained, pain and emotions are "connected in the brain," and emotional factors may act to trigger "learned nerve pathways" that give rise to pain.

Past studies have found that compared with people without fibromyalgia, those with the disorder have higher rates of stressful life events, such as childhood abuse, marital problems and high levels of job stress. There is also evidence that they are relatively less aware of their own emotions and more reluctant to express their feelings, particularly anger.

For the new study, published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, Schubiner and his colleagues tested the effects of affective self-awareness -- a technique Schubiner developed and uses in treating certain chronic-pain conditions -- on fibromyalgia.

They randomly assigned 45 women with the condition to either undergo the therapy or go on a wait-list for treatment, serving as a control group. Women in the treatment group each had a one-on-one consultation, then attended three group meetings to learn the affective self-awareness techniques so that they could carry them out on their own.

The therapy involves an educational component where patients learn about the emotion-pain connection. They learn specific techniques -- including mindfulness meditation and "expressive" writing -- for recognizing and dealing with the emotions that may be contributing to their pain. Patients are also encouraged to get back to any exercise or other activities that they have been avoiding due to pain.

Schubiner's team found that six months later, 46 percent of the treatment group had at least a 30-percent reduction in their pain ratings compared with scores at the outset. And 21 percent had a 50-percent or greater reduction.
None of the women in the control group had a comparable improvement.

The study is only the first clinical trial to test affective self-awareness for fibromyalgia, and it had a number of limitations, including its small size. In addition, the control group received no active therapy to serve as a comparison.

That is important because it is possible for patients to benefit from simply receiving attention from a healthcare provider, or being part of small-group sessions with other people suffering from the same condition, for example.

Schubiner also acknowledged that this general "model" for understanding and addressing fibromyalgia pain is controversial.

He said that he and his colleagues have applied for funding to conduct a larger clinical trial comparing affective self-awareness with standard cognitive-behavioral therapy.

Affective self-awareness and cognitive-behavioral therapy have similarities, according to Schubiner. Both, for example, try to show patients that they have the power to improve their own health.

A key difference, Schubiner said, is that affective self-awareness asks people to "directly engage" the emotions that may be helping to drive their symptoms.

Another difference is that, right now, only a small number of healthcare providers practice affective self-awareness, according to Schubiner.

Some components of the technique, such as teachings in mindfulness meditation, are more widely available. But whether those practices in isolation would help fibromyalgia patients' pain is not clear.

Author: Reuters
Source: Journal of General Internal Medicine, online June 8, 2010.


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Chiropractors on Capitol Hill Push for Improved Coverage for Medicare Beneficiaries

More than 700 chiropractors and chiropractic students from across the nation gathered in Washington, D.C. today to urge Congress to support H.R. 3654, legislation that would give Medicare beneficiaries improved coverage of non-drug services for pain relief, potentially helping some to avoid using prescription opioid pain medications.† Boosting support for H.R. 3654, the Chiropractic Medicare Coverage Modernization Act, was a focus this year at the American Chiropractic Associationís (ACA) annual meeting and advocacy event, ACA Engage.† The bipartisan bill would enable beneficiaries to more easily access the chiropractic profession's broad-based, non-drug approach to pain management.† During a kick-off event, ACA President Robert C. Jones, DC, told attendees, "You are intimately familiar with the issues facing your patients.† No one is better to deliver that message [to Capitol Hill]." Dr. Jones was followed by John Rosa, DC, a nationally recognized expert on the opioid crisis who serves as a consultant to the White House and federal agencies.† Dr. Rosa discussed the positive response to chiropractic he has received in healthcare policy circles where solutions to the opioid crisis are discussed.† "We are part of this solution," he noted.† Dr. Rosa said that chiropractors can offer the added advantage of prevention and health promotion services, such as advice on diet, exercise and injury prevention, which can potentially help patients prevent pain before it starts.† "Lifestyle and pain management.† We are that missing piece, and we have been for a long time," he said. Speaker Bonnie S. Hillsberg, DC, MHA, MEd, of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Division of Tribal Affairs, explained that opioids are a major problem in the Native American/Alaskan Native community as well, and that chiropractic services can be an important tool in alleviating their reliance on pain medications.† "Non-drug approaches have become an important strategy in stemming the national problem of opioid overuse and abuse," she said.† Rounding out the morning's line up was Christine Goertz, DC, PhD, chair of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), established as part of the Affordable Care Act to fund research to help patients, caregivers, and healthcare practitioners make evidence-based, patient-centered healthcare decisions.† Dr. Goertz said that she is encouraged not only by ongoing research into chiropractic's effectiveness but also emerging trends in health care that emphasize providers working collaboratively to help patients.† Additionally, ACA Senior Vice President of Public Policy and Advocacy John Falardeau presented the ACA's Congressional Health Care Leadership Award to Jessica Burnell, a health care policy advisor in the office of Rep. Brian Higgins (D-N.Y.), lead sponsor of H.R. 3654.† ACA Engage is the premier national conference for doctors of chiropractic, chiropractic assistants and chiropractic students.† ACA Engage (formerly called NCLC) has a long history of bringing together industry leaders from all over the country to meet with members of Congress on Capitol Hill.† The program has expanded to also include a robust variety of education offerings (with CE credits available), speeches from respected thought leaders and panel discussions that delve into important topics.† The new name reflects the associationís efforts to position the chiropractic profession for success by engaging a new generation of doctors with these exciting education, career and leadership development opportunities.

Author: American Chiropractic Association
Source: Acatoday.com. January 30, 2020


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Electric Bikes and Scooters Associated with Severe Injuries

Electric bikes (commonly referred to as "E-bikes") and powered scooters are growing in popularity and as a result, their associated injuries are on the rise.† Unfortunately, the pattern of injuries resulting from the use of these powered wheeled devices is more severe than their non-electric and non-powered counterparts.† According to 2000 to 2017 data from the US National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, the injury data showed:†

  • E-bike injuries were more likely include internal injuries and require hospital admission
  • E-bike injuries were more than 3 times more likely to involve a collision with a pedestrian than either pedal bicycles or powered scooters
  • E-bike injuries have been increasing dramatically, especially among older persons
  • Powered scooter injuries were nearly 3 times more likely to result in concussion†

Be smart and be aware.† If you decide to use an electric/powered scooter or bike, be cautious and wear the appropriate safety equipment, including a properly fitted helmet as well as knee, elbow and if applicable, wrist guards.† Eye protection and appropriate clothing should additionally be considered.†

Did you know doctors of chiropractic are specifically trained in the diagnosis and care of soft tissue injuries?† If you have sustained an injury from an E-bike, scooter or any other wheeled equipment, call us today!† We can quickly diagnosis and care for you and your injury, getting you back to healthy and happy, safely and quickly!

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Injury Prevention, online November 11, 2019.


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Most Sustained Weight Loss Lowers Womenís Breast Cancer Risk

Women 50 years and older who lose a modest amount of weight and keep it off can reduce their risk for acquiring breast cancer, according to researchers.† Researchers set out to identify if weight loss in women 50+ would reduce their risk of breast cancer.† Weight loss was defined as 4 pounds or more lost and maintained over a 10-year period. Data from more than 180,000 women was evaluated.† Compared with women with stable weight during study period, women with sustained weight loss had a lower risk of breast cancer.† Researchers concludes, "These results suggest that sustained weight loss, even modest amounts, is associated with lower breast cancer risk for women aged ≥50 years. Breast cancer prevention may be a strong weight loss motivator for the two-thirds of American women who are overweight or obese."

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, online December 17, 2019.


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