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November 2021 Health Newsletter

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» Broccoli - The Cancer Fighter
» "Mind-body" Therapy Shows Promise For Fibromyalgia
» Consider Chiropractic Care For Certain Childhood Headaches
» Study Links Inactivity to Diabetes
» Donít Lose Sleep Over Late Night Workouts

Broccoli - The Cancer Fighter

What if a few servings of broccoli a week could help prevent, even fight off prostate cancer? New research indicates there may just be truth to this. A team of British researchers from the Institute of Food Research found dietary broccoli consumption of 400 grams per week activated genes that control inflammation and cancer formation in the prostate. According to researchers, when people get cancer some genes are switched off and some are switched on, and, what broccoli seems to be doing is switching on genes which prevent cancer development and switching off other genes that help it to spread. Thus, dietary broccoli consumption was able to affect the expression of cancer formation/inflammation/spreading genes in a positive manner. Prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death in men with approximately 680,000 men diagnosed worldwide.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: PLoS One. July 2, 2008.


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"Mind-body" Therapy Shows Promise For Fibromyalgia

A form of 'mind-body' therapy that focuses on the role of emotions in physical pain may offer some relief to people with fibromyalgia, a small clinical trial suggests.

The study, of 45 women with fibromyalgia, found that those who learned a technique called "affective self-awareness" were more likely to show a significant reduction in their pain over six months. Overall, 46 percent of the women had a 30-percent or greater reduction in their pain severity, as measured by a standard pain-rating scale.

Fibromyalgia is a syndrome marked by widespread pain -- including discomfort at specific "tender points" in the body -- along with symptoms such as fatigue, irritable bowel and sleep problems. It is estimated to affect up to 5 million U.S. adults, most commonly middle-aged women.

The precise cause of fibromyalgia is unknown -- there are no physical signs, such as inflammation and tissue damage in the painful area -- but some researchers believe the disorder involves problems in how the brain processes pain signals.

Standard treatments include painkillers, antidepressants, cognitive- behavioral therapy and exercise therapy. However, many people with fibromyalgia find that their symptoms -- pain, in particular -- persist despite treatment.

Part of that, according to the researchers on the new study, may be because standard treatments do not specifically address the role psychological stress and emotions can play in triggering people's pain.

That is not to say that the pain people with fibromyalgia feel is "all in their head," stressed Dr. Howard Schubiner, of St. John Health/ Providence Hospital and Medical Centers in Southfield, Michigan.

"The pain is very real," Schubiner said in an interview. But, he explained, pain and emotions are "connected in the brain," and emotional factors may act to trigger "learned nerve pathways" that give rise to pain.

Past studies have found that compared with people without fibromyalgia, those with the disorder have higher rates of stressful life events, such as childhood abuse, marital problems and high levels of job stress. There is also evidence that they are relatively less aware of their own emotions and more reluctant to express their feelings, particularly anger.

For the new study, published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, Schubiner and his colleagues tested the effects of affective self-awareness -- a technique Schubiner developed and uses in treating certain chronic-pain conditions -- on fibromyalgia.

They randomly assigned 45 women with the condition to either undergo the therapy or go on a wait-list for treatment, serving as a control group. Women in the treatment group each had a one-on-one consultation, then attended three group meetings to learn the affective self-awareness techniques so that they could carry them out on their own.

The therapy involves an educational component where patients learn about the emotion-pain connection. They learn specific techniques -- including mindfulness meditation and "expressive" writing -- for recognizing and dealing with the emotions that may be contributing to their pain. Patients are also encouraged to get back to any exercise or other activities that they have been avoiding due to pain.

Schubiner's team found that six months later, 46 percent of the treatment group had at least a 30-percent reduction in their pain ratings compared with scores at the outset. And 21 percent had a 50-percent or greater reduction.
None of the women in the control group had a comparable improvement.

The study is only the first clinical trial to test affective self-awareness for fibromyalgia, and it had a number of limitations, including its small size. In addition, the control group received no active therapy to serve as a comparison.

That is important because it is possible for patients to benefit from simply receiving attention from a healthcare provider, or being part of small-group sessions with other people suffering from the same condition, for example.

Schubiner also acknowledged that this general "model" for understanding and addressing fibromyalgia pain is controversial.

He said that he and his colleagues have applied for funding to conduct a larger clinical trial comparing affective self-awareness with standard cognitive-behavioral therapy.

Affective self-awareness and cognitive-behavioral therapy have similarities, according to Schubiner. Both, for example, try to show patients that they have the power to improve their own health.

A key difference, Schubiner said, is that affective self-awareness asks people to "directly engage" the emotions that may be helping to drive their symptoms.

Another difference is that, right now, only a small number of healthcare providers practice affective self-awareness, according to Schubiner.

Some components of the technique, such as teachings in mindfulness meditation, are more widely available. But whether those practices in isolation would help fibromyalgia patients' pain is not clear.

Author: Reuters
Source: Journal of General Internal Medicine, online June 8, 2010.


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Consider Chiropractic Care For Certain Childhood Headaches

Similar to adults, the impact headaches have on children can be substantial. Children suffering from headaches can experience struggles in school, sports, social life and just the fun of being a kid. The number of children suffering from headaches is also substantial. Fortunately, chiropractic care is not only effective in treating many headache-types in adults, research indicates it can also be effective in children. According to a 2009 national sampling of American children aged 4 to 18 years of age, 17% reported frequent or severe headaches including migraine within the previous 12 months. In 2019, a similar collection of headache data was obtained from 3,386 Australian children and adolescents aged 10 to 18 years of age. Collected data found 76% experienced one or more headaches in the previous 12 months. More specifically, 26% experienced mild headache(s) lasting less than 1 hour, 24% experienced migraine(s), 22% experienced tension-type headache(s), and 3% experienced headaches lasting more than 15 days/month. Also, 42% experienced restrictions in daily activities due to headaches. Additionally, a full 50% of those children and adolescent headache sufferers used medication for their headaches. In 2021, a Denmark study was published which investigated the effectiveness of chiropractic spinal manipulation vs. a sham manipulation in 7 to 14 year old children suffering from recurrent headaches. Researchers collected their data over a 5 year period. The data revealed chiropractic manipulation resulted in significantly few days with headaches. The researchers concluded, "Chiropractic spinal manipulation resulted in fewer headaches and higher global perceived effect, with only minor side effects." If you have a child that is suffering from headaches, consider having them evaluated by your local chiropractor. Chiropractic care is safe, effective and non-invasive. Many chiropractors also offer a no obligation evaluation at no cost.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: J Headache Pain 20, 101 (2019)


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Study Links Inactivity to Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is an ever-increasing and insidious health risk. Studies in the past have linked the lack of physical activity to the risk of becoming diabetic. A new study conducted by Gibbs and his colleagues on 2,027 overweight people between the ages of 38 and 50 showed a definite correlation between a lack of daily physical activity and the increased risk of diabetes. Although certain elements of the study were critiqued by other professionals, the overall feeling was that the study once again demonstrated that being sedentary for up to 10 hours per day was a definitive factor in being at risk for developing diabetes. The study supported the benefits of a healthy, active lifestyle as well as a lifestyle that limits inactivity. People who were sedentary for a minimum of 10 hours per day were more than twice as likely to end up with glucose tolerance issues leading to diabetes than people whose daily sedentary time was less than 6 hours per day. The study suggests that people with daily sedentary behavior can reduce their risk of developing glucose intolerance impairment and subsequently developing diabetes by adding a regimen of daily physical activity to their behavior.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Diabetes Care, online July 8, 2015


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Donít Lose Sleep Over Late Night Workouts

Have a hectic schedule that leaves the only opportunity for you to workout later in the day or at night? Many individuals naturally assume that working out later in the day or at night will keep them from getting a good nights rest. New information suggests this may not be the case. Recently, 1,000 participants completed either a phone or web-based questionnaire with questions related to sleep and physical activity. According to the results and contrary to what one might think, individuals who engaged in moderate to vigorous exercise within 4 hours of going to sleep reported having the same quality of sleep as those who did not exercise. Even with those findings, experts recommended that the late night workouts within a few hours of sleep be less intense and that what may work for one individual, could affect another individual differently. So while late night workouts may not be for everyone, they actually do appear to work for some. If the only time to squeeze in a workout is at night, itís definitely worth giving it a try!

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Sleep Medicine, online February 10, 2014.


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